Unraid and Robocopy Problems

In my last post I described how I converted one of my W2K16 servers to Unraid, and how I am preparing for conversion of the second server.

As I’ve been copying all my data from W2K16 to Unraid, I discovered some interesting discrepancies between W2K16 SMB and Unraid SMB. I use robocopy to mirror files from one server to the other, and once the first run completes, any subsequent runs should complete without needing to copy any files again (unless they were modified).

First, you have to use the “robocopy.exe /mir [dest] /mir /fft” option, for Fat File Times, allowing for 2 seconds of drift in file timestamps.

I found a large number of files that would copy over and over with no changes to the source files. I also found a particular folder that would “magically” show up on Unraid, and cannot be deleted from the Unraid share by robocopy.

After some troubleshooting, I discovered that files with old timestamps, and folder names that end in a dot, do not copy correctly to Unraid.

I looked at the files that would not copy, and I discovered that the file modified timestamps were all set to “1 Jan 1970 00:00”. I experimented by changing the modified timestamp to today’s date, and the files copied correctly. It seems that if the modified timestamp on the source file is older than 1 Jan 1980, the modified timestamp on Unraid for the same newly created file will always be set as 1 Jan 1980. When then running robocopy again, the source files will always be reported as older, and the file copied again.

Below is an example of a folder of test files with a created date of 1 Jan 1970 UTC, I copy the files using robocopy, and copy them again. The second run of robocopy again copies all the files, instead of reporting them as similar. One can see that the destination timestamp is set to 1 Jan 1980, not 1 Jan 1970 as expected.

The second set of problem files occur in folder names ending in a dot. Unraid ignores the dots on the end of the folder names, and when another folder exists without dots, the copy operation uses the wrong folder.

Below is an example of a folder that contains two directories, one named “LocalState”, and one named “LocalState..”. I robocopy the folder contents, and when running robocopy again, it reports an extra folder. That extra folder gets “magically” created in the destination directory, but the “LocalState..” folder is missing.

The same robocopy operations to the W2K16 server over SMB works as expected.

From what I researched, the timestamp ranges for NTFS is 1 January 1601 to 14 September 30828, FAT is 1 January 1980 to 31 December 2107, and EXT4 is 1 January 1970 to 19 January 2106 (2038 + 408). I could not create files with a date earlier than 1 Jan 1980, but I could set file modified timestamps to dates greater than 2106, so I do not know what the Unraid timestamp range is.

Creating and accessing directories with trailing dots requires special care on Windows using the NT style notation, e.g. “CreateDirectoryW(L”\\\\?\\C:\\Users\\piete\\Unraid.Badfiles\\TestDot..”, NULL), but robocopy does handle that correctly on W2K16 SMB.

I don’t know if the observed behavior is specific to Unraid SMB, or if it would apply to Samba on Linux in general. But, it posed a problem as I wanted to make sure I do indeed have all files correctly backed up.

I decided to write a quick little app to find problem files and folders. The app iterates through all files and folders, it will fix timestamps that are out of range, and report on finding files or folders that end in a dot. I ran it through my files, it fixed the timestamps for me, and I deleted the folders ending in dot by hand. Multiple robocopy runs now complete as expected.

 

 

 

Moving from W2K16 to Unraid

I have been happy with my server rack running my UniFi network equipment and two Windows Server 2016 (W2K16) instances. I use the servers for archiving my media collection and running Hyper-V for all sorts of home projects and work related experiments. But, time moves on, one can never have enough storage, and technology changes. So I set about a path that lead to me replacing my W2K16 servers with Unraid.

I currently use Adaptec 7805Q and 81605ZQ RAID cards, with a mixture of SSD for caching, SSD RAID1 for boot and VM images, and HDD RAID6 for the large media storage array. The setup has been solid, and although I’ve had both SSD and HDD failures, the hot spares kicked in, and I replaced the failed drives with new hot spares, no data lost.

For my large RAID6 media array I used lots of HGST 4TB Ultrastar (enterprise) and Deskstar (consumer) drives, but I am out of open slots in my 24-bay 4U case, so adding more storage has become a problem. I can replace the 4TB drives with larger drives, but in order to expand the RAID6 volume without loosing data, I need to replace all disks in the array, one-by-one, rebuilding parity in between every drive upgrade, and then expand the volume. This will be very expensive, take a very long time, and risk the data during during every drive rebuild.

I have been looking for more flexible provisioning solutions, including Unraid, FreeNAS, OpenMediaVaultStorage Spaces, and Storage Spaces Direct. I am not just looking for dynamic storage, I also want a system that can run VM’s, and Docker containers, I want it to work with consumer and or small business hardware, and I do not want to spend all my time messing around in a CLI.

I have tried Storage Spaces with limited success, but that was a long time ago. Storage Spaces Direct offers significant improvements, but with more stringent enterprise hardware requirements, that would make it too costly and complicated for my home use.

FreeNAS offers the best storage capabilities, but I found the VM and Docker ecosystem to be an afterthought and still lacking.

OpenMediaVault (OMV) is a relative newcomer, the web front-end is modern, think of OMV as Facebook and FreeNAS and Unraid as MySpace, with growing support for VM’s and Docker. Compared to FreeNAS and Unraid the OMV community is still very small, and I was reluctant to entrust my data to it.

Unraid offered a good balance between storage, VM, and Docker, with a large support community. Unlike FreeNAS and OMV, Unraid is not free, but the price is low enough.

An ideal solution would have been the storage flexibility offered by FreeNAS, the docker and VM app ecosystem offered by Unraid, and the UI of OMV. Since that does not exist, I opted to go with Unraid.

Picking a replacement OS was one problem, but moving the existing systems to run on it, without loosing data or workloads, quite another. I decided to convert the two servers one at a time, so I moved all the Hyper-V workloads from Server-2 with the 8-bay chassis, to Server-1 with the 24-bay chassis. This left Server-1 unused, and I could go about converting it to Unraid. I not only had to install Unraid, I also had to provision enough storage in the 8-bay chassis to hold all the data from the 24-bay chassis, so that I could then move the data on Server-1 to Server-2, convert Server-1 to Unraid, and move the data back to Server-1. And I had to do this without risking the data, and without an extended outage.

To get all the data from Server-1 to fit on Server-2, I pruned the near 60TB set down to around 40TB. You know how it works, no matter how much storage you have it will always be filled. I purchased 4 x 12TB Seagate IronWolf ST12000VN0007 drives, and combined with 2 x 4TB HGST drives, gave me around 44TB of of usable storage space, enough to copy all the important data from Server-1 to Server-2.

While I was at it, I decided to upgrade the IPMI firmware, motherboard BIOS, and RAID controller firmware. I knew it is possible to upgrade the SuperMicro BIOS through IPMI, but you have to buy a per-motherboard locked Out-of-Band feature key from SuperMicro to enable this, something I had never bothered doing. While looking for a way to buy a code online, I found an interesting post describing a method of creating my own activation keys, and it worked.

IPMI updated, motherboard BIOS updated, RAID firmware updated, I set about converting the Adaptec RAID controller from RAID to HBA mode. Unlike the LSI controllers that need to be re-flashed with IR or IT firmware to change modes, the Adaptec controller allows this configuration via the controller BIOS. In order to change modes, all drives have to be uninitialized, but there were two drives that I could not uninitialize. After some troubleshooting I discovered that it is not possible to delete MaxCache arrays from the BIOS. I had to boot using the Adaptec bootUSB Utility, that is a Linux bootable image that runs the MaxView storage controller GUI. MaxCache volumes deleted, I could convert to HBA mode.

With the controller in HBA mode, I set about installing Unraid, well, it is not really installing in the classic sense, Unraid runs from a USB drive, and all drives in the system are used for storage. There are lots of info online on installing and configuring Unraid, but I found very good info on the Spaceinvader One Youtube channel. I have seen some reports of issues with USB drives, but I had no problems using a SanDisk Cruzer Fit drive.

It took a couple iterations before I was happy with the setup, and here are a few important things I learned:

  • Unraid does not support SSD drives as data drives, see the install docs; “Do not assign an SSD as a data/parity device. While unRAID won’t stop you from doing this, SSDs are only supported for use as cache devices due TRIM/discard and how it impacts parity protection. Using SSDs as data/parity devices is unsupported and may result in data loss at this time.” This is one area where FreeNAS and OMV offer much better redundancy solutions using e.g. ZFS over Unraid’s parity solution, or many other commercial solutions that have for many years been using SSD’s in drive arrays.
  • Unraid’s caching solution using SSD drives and BTRFS works just ok. Unlike e.g. Adaptec MaxCache that seamlessly caches block storage regardless of the file system, the Unraid cache works at the file level. While this does create flexibility in deciding which files from which shares should be using the cache, it greatly complicates matters when running out of space on the cache. When a file is created on the cache, and the file is then enlarged to the point it no longer fits in the available space, the file operation will permanently fail. E.g. copying a large file to a cached share, and the file is larger that the available space, the copy will proceed until the cache runs out of space, and then fail, repeat and get the same. To avoid this, one has to set the minimum free space setting to a value larger than the largest file that would ever be created on the cache, for large files, this is very wasteful. Imagine a thin provisioned VM image, it can grow until no space, and then fail, until manually moved to a different drive.
  • The cache re-balancing and file moving algorithm is very rudimentary, the operation is schedule per time period, and will move files from the cache to regular storage. There is no support for flushing the cache in real-time as it runs out of space, there is no high water or low water mechanisms, no LRU or MRU file access logic. I installed the Mover Tuning plugin that allows balancing the cache based on consumed space, better, but still not good enough.
  • Exhausting the cache space while copying files to Unraid is painfully slow. I used robocopy to copy files from W2K16 to a share on Unraid that had caching set to “preferred”, meaning use the cache if it has space, and as soon as the cache ran out of space, the copy operation slowed down to a crawl. As soon as the cache ran out of space, new files were supposed to be written to HDD, but my experience showed that something was not working, and I had to disable the cache and then copy the files. The whole SSD and caching thing is a big disappointment.
  • Building parity while copying files is very slow. Copying files using robocopy while the parity was building resulted in about 200Mbps throughput, very slow. I cancelled the parity operation, disabled the parity drive, and copied with no parity protection in place, and got near the expected 1Gbps throughput. I will re-enable parity building after all data is copied across.
  • Performing typical disk based operations like add-, remove-, or replace- a drive, is very cumbersome. The wiki tries to explain, but it is still very confusing. I really expected much easier ways of doing typical disk based operations, especially when almost all operations result in the parity becoming invalid, leaving the system exposed to failure.
  • It is really easy to use Docker, with containers directly from Docker Hub, or from the Community Applications plugin that acts like an app store.
  • It is reasonably easy to create VM’s, one has to manually install the LibVirt KVM/QEMU drivers in Windows OS’s, but it is made easy with the automatic mounting of the LibVirt driver ISO.
  • I could not get any Ubuntu Desktop VM’s working, they would all hang during install. I had no problems with Ubuntu Server installs. I am sure there is a solution, I just did not try looking yet as I only needed Ubuntu Server.
  • VM runtime management is lacking, there is no support for snapshots or backups. One can install the Virt-Manager container to help, but it is still rather rudimentary compared to offerings from VMWare, Hyper-V, and VirtualBox.
  • In order to get things working I had to install several community plugins, I would have expected this functionality to be included in the base installation. Given how active the plugin authors are in the community, I wonder if not including said functionality by default may be intentional?
  • Drive power saving works very well, and drives are spun down when not in use. I will have to revisit the file and folder to drive distribution, as common access patterns to common files should be constrained to the same physical drive.
  • The community forum is very active and very helpful.

I still have a few days of file copying left, and I will keep my W2K16 server operational until I am confident in the integrity and performance of Unraid. When I’m ready, I’ll convert the second server to Unraid, and then re-balance the storage, VM, and Docker workloads between the two servers.